How to Treat the 3 Most Common Tennis Injuries

tennis

This blog will show you how to cope with the 3 most common Tennis injuries. The fast paced dynamic nature of tennis makes it a potential hotspot for injuries…any of these sound familiar?

Tennis ElbowTennis-elbow-or-lateral-epicondylitis

This is an overuse injury also known as Lateral Epicondylitis, affecting the tendons attaching to the bones around the elbow. Thought to be caused by the continual tearing of the muscles attaching to the joint this chronic condition is thought to be caused either by an increase in duration of play, or sometimes the tension of strings in the racket. It can also be due to poor technique and lack of conditioning of the muscles.

Treating the condition is a mixture of icing and rest at home, and ultrasound and soft tissue therapy with a Sports Therapist.

Frozen Shoulder

To use it’s full name, Adhesive Capsulitis is an inflammatory condition that reduces range of movement in the shoulder joint. Most common in people over 40 years old, the treatment for this condition normal consists of anti-inflammatory medication in the first instance followed by physical therapy, massage and in more severe cases surgery.

Ankle ligament Sprain

Due to the nature of tennis there is a lot of sideways movement and quick changes of direction, this can put the ankle joint under stress. The most common are the lateral (outside) ligaments of the ankle. There are 3 grades of sprain, grade I is mild swelling, maybe bruising, and some pain. Grade III is complete rupture of the ligament, large amounts of swelling, bruising and pain. Grade II is anything in between. The classic RICE techniques are still the ones to follow, however there is is some evidence emerging that heat, not ice may be the way to go….we’ll keep you posted! Following that, withing 48hrs get yourself to a good Sports Therapist to help you rehab back to full fitness.

There are plenty more, patella tendinitis, rotator cuff tear, meniscus injuries…for advice on the best way to treat your injury see a professional.

 

Written by Samantha Cox, Sports Therapist and Owner of Active Potential Therapy.

 

 

 

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